Interactive UI Inspiration #2

Best interactive UI from this week (through March 24) on Dribbble. If this inspires you to make your own site, check out Mammoth Interactive’s Web Developer course.

Moosylvania Homepage by Lucas Richter

Moosylvania Homepage by Lucas Richter

About music application by Edward Zheng

About music application by Edward Zheng

Sign In with Touch ID by Edvinas

Sign In with Touch ID by Edvinas

Suso Timeframe Page by Clément Pavageau

Suso Timeframe Page by Clément Pavageau

Music player by Marko Malinovic

Music player by Marko Malinovic

Arkk Shoes Interaction Animation by Nathan Riley

Arkk Shoes Interaction Animation by Nathan Riley

Fresh Tilled Soil Early Work Design Concept by Katerina Garcia

Fresh Tilled Soil Early Work Design Concept by Katerina Garcia

B&O — Beoplay H8 🎧 by Steve Fraschini

B&O — Beoplay H8 🎧 by Steve Fraschini

Illuminati Ice — Typographic product page by Daniel Montgomery

Illuminati Ice — Typographic product page by Daniel Montgomery

Minimize/Maximize Micro-Interaction by Bravecreation

Minimize/Maximize Micro-Interaction by Bravecreation

iCV Cart's animation by Alexander Plyuto

iCV Cart’s animation by Alexander Plyuto

Music Branding checkout prototype by Ben Cross

Music Branding checkout prototype by Ben Cross

Nav3 by eve weinberg

Nav3 by eve weinberg

Blog Page Animation by Daniel Korpai

Blog Page Animation by Daniel Korpai

Nike design by Leo Natsume

Nike design by Leo Natsume

If you’re inspired to make your own website, consider enrolling in Mammoth Interactive’s Web Developer course.

Static UI Inspiration #2

Best static UI from this week (through March 23) on Dribbble. If this inspires you to make your own app, check out Mammoth Interactive’s Ultimate iOS course.

Wearther App by feige

Wearther App by feige

Hiking, rock climbing concept app by Rit

Hiking, rock climbing concept app by Rit

66 Burger Website by Matthew Levesque

66 Burger Website by Matthew Levesque

Profile Page - Feeling Blue by Katharinah

Profile Page – Feeling Blue by Katharinah

404 page by Amanda

404 page by Amanda

Black & White Fixie by Antoni Botev

Black & White Fixie by Antoni Botev

Let us know in the comments below, who to feature next week! Inspired to make your own app? Check out Mammoth Interactive’s Ultimate iOS course.

Activating Virtual Reality | Unity Tutorial

The first step to making a virtual reality (VR) game is activating VR Mode. In this tutorial, you will learn how to integrate a VR software development kit (SDK). If you are a beginner and want to learn how to build virtual reality games, check out our Unity3D course!

What is VR Mode?

Create a new Unity project named “VRInteractions”. Save the file to your Project folder. Leave 3D rendering enabled.

In the file that opens, select Main Camera from the Hierarchy. Notice that in the Scene window, there are gray lines protruding from the camera. These lines outline the area that the camera renders.

Create a cube in the Hierarchy. Put the cube in the position 0 0 0. Select Main Camera. In the Scene, you will be able to see that the cube is inside the rendering area of Main Camera. The cube is inside the shape made by the gray lines protruding from Main Camera.

If you move the cube outside the area outlined by the gray lines, the camera will not render the cube. The player will not be able to see the cube.

A VR game contains two cameras to represent two human eyes. The left camera shows the scene from the player’s left eye. The right camera shows the scene from their right eye. With the help of a VR device, dividing the view into two cameras makes feel as though they are in a virtual world.

Downloading SDK

Delete Cube and Main Camera (1) from the Hierarchy. There are multiple ways to create a VR environment. We will use the SDK of Google Cardboard. Google Cardboard is a VR platform in which a user places a smartphone into a cardboard viewer. When the user looks into the viewer, they see the game on their phone in 3D.

If you do not have Google Cardboard, you can change the SDK settings to disable VR Mode. You will be able to play the game on your phone without VR Mode.

To download Google Cardboard, go to www.developers.google.com/vr/unity. You will reach the page “Google VR SDK for Unity”. This page provides details about what the features of this SDK.

The bottom of the page contains useful links. Click on the “Unity API Reference” link to open a page containing details on how to implement the SDK.

You can look through this page to see details regarding the coding of the SDK, such as the available classes.

To download the SDK, click on the “Google VR SDK for Unity” link at the bottom of www.developers.google.com/vr/unity.

To integrate the SDK into the Unity project, you could clone the entire repository hosted on GitHub. Alternatively, click on the “gvr-unity-sdk” link.

You will be taken to a GitHub webpage. Click on “GoogleVRForUnity.unitypackage”. On the page that loads, press the Download button to download the SDK.

Double-click on the file that appears in your Downloads folder. Once the files decompress, an Import Unity Package window will open.

A Unity Package is like a zip file. It is a compressed file that contains many other files inside it.

You can see that the file contains scripts, materials, images, prefabs, and more. Instead of making our own plug-ins, we can import the ones in this package and adjust them. Press the Import button. Once the assets import, all the necessary files for activating the VR Mode will be in your Assets folder.

Depending on the Unity or SDK version you are using, you may be prompted to perform another import to ensure compatibility. You can press Import Package > Import to import the second package.

Want to learn more? Check out our Unity3D course, where you build 30 virtual reality games!

If Blocks in C# | Unity Tutorial

Suppose we wanted to run code only when a certain condition is met. For instance, a player could only fly in a game if they had a jet pack. A player could only buy a bicycle if they had enough money. To implement this kind of functionality, we can use if blocks. If you are a beginner and want to learn how to build virtual reality games, check out our Unity3D course!

An if block runs code when a specified condition passes. In the Start method from our previous tutorial, use the following format to create an if block.

// Use this for initialization
void Start () {
transform.name = ImproveName(newName);

if () {

}
}

The code in between the if block’s parentheses will contain the condition that needs to be met. If the condition passes, the code in the scope definition (between the curly braces) will execute.

Give the if block the following condition. The if block will execute code because 1 plus 1 equals 2.

// Use this for initialization
void Start () {
transform.name = ImproveName(newName);

if (1 + 1 == 2) {

}
}

Note that a single equals sign (=) assigns a value. A double equals sign (==) is a comparison.

Type the following code in the if block. The string “We’re here!” will print in the console if the if block’s condition is true.

// Use this for initialization
void Start () {
transform.name = ImproveName(newName);

if (1 + 1 == 2) {

}
}

Save the script, and open Unity. Press Play. The message “We’re here!” will print in the console. This means that the if block’s condition passed.

Let’s test a different condition in the if block. Use the following code to make the if block test if the string “cats” equals the string “dogs”.

// Use this for initialization
void Start () {
transform.name = ImproveName(newName);

if ("cats" == "dogs") {
Debug.Log ("We're here!");
}
}

Save the script, and open Unity. Press Play. A warning will appear in the console stating that there is unreachable code at Line 14 of Cube.cs.

This warning appears because the compiler already knows that “cats” will never equal “dogs”. Thus the compiler automatically converts the condition in the parentheses to false. The code in the if block will never be executed.

What if we want the if block to execute code only if a condition is false? Create the following if block, which will run code when “cats” is not equal to “dogs”. The exclamation mark means “NOT”.

// Use this for initialization
void Start () {
transform.name = ImproveName(newName);

if ("cats" == "dogs") {
Debug.Log ("We're here!");
}

if ("cats" != "dogs") {
Debug.Log ("We're there!")
}
}

Save the script, and open Unity. Press Play. The message “We’re there!” will print in the console.

Want to learn more about if blocks? Check out our Unity3D course, where you build 30 virtual reality games!

5 MORE Talks About Virtual Reality

3. How Virtual Reality Changes the Story… and the Audience | Max Planck

4. Women in Virtual Reality and Immersive Entertainment