Looks like we’ll all be coders soon.

Everyone is worried about losing their job to machines. You may have heard of the robots that replaced burger flippers in California. But are all of our jobs really at risk?

While some jobs will be lost to Artificial Intelligence (AI), others will be created by it. A statistics evaluation published last month from the United States Department of Labor ranked software developers on the projected “Occupations with the most job growth” for 2024. The employment count of software developers in the US is predicted to increase by 18.8%. The median annual wage in 2016 for this occupation was $100,080.

Evidently, it’s looking good for people studying software development. As FastCompany says, coding is coming to every industry you can think of. There’s even a management agency for coding talent.

But you don’t need to join a coding agency to be a coder. Odds are, as technology progresses, you’ll have to incorporate coding as part of your job.

Luckily, learning to code doesn’t mean you have to go back to university for 4 years. Online learning makes programming easy to learn from home. As we embrace that we’ll have to learn new skills to keep up with technology, we’ll be able to work with innovation rather than against it to make life more stable and efficient. 👍

You’re invited! Come to our SpriteKit webinar.

Do you want to make 2D games for Apple products? Join master programmer Nimish Narang for a 1-hour webinar on how to navigate the SpriteKit framework. Register here for just 10 dollars.

Why SpriteKit?

SpriteKit is THE framework for making 2D games for Apple products. It’s free! You can make cool games, from super simple to more complex, in SpriteKit. SpriteKit provides support for cool special effects and physics. It’s a fun interface to express your creativity. Before you know it, you could see a game you built in SpriteKit in the App Store!

Here’s what we’ll do:

– Learn the basics of scenes, nodes, actions, and physics bodies in Xcode’s game engine
– Put all the concepts together to make the simple version of a classic game for iOS

But wait, there’s MORE! If you enroll in this webinar, you’ll get 2 FREE courses from Mammoth Interactive. First, you’ll get our NEW Introduction to SpriteKit course, where you learn how to build 3 games in SpriteKit. Second, you’ll get our 77-hour course on how to build virtual reality games with Blender and Unity3D!

Have fun, and learn something new. Reserve your spot today for just 10 dollars.

Being a coder isn’t just about coding.

We’re excited to announce our new Kickstarter: Complete Guide to Self-Promotion for Techies and Startups. We need your help to make a course that teaches coders soft skills. ‘Soft skills’ include teamwork, communication and management skills.

If you want to start your own coding business, there’s much more to it than the technical aspects of the job.

We want to teach coders how to stand out in the tech industry and successfully start their own business. Even if you don’t want to make your own company, this course will teach you skills that will make you invaluable wherever you work.

We’ve identified 6 key topics that can strengthen the core of your coding business:

  • The psychology of entrepreneurship
  • Fusing soft skills and software development
  • The code of human interaction
  • The art of persuasion
  • Expanding creativity
  • Mastering team dynamics

We don’t believe in hypotheticals.

Our course will provide you with practical examples of issues you’ll face in the coding industry. We based our curriculum on proven psychological methods and on our experiences in the coding industry.

If you take this course, you will become part of a community of students supported by us. You’ll go from talented coder to business champion. Visit our Kickstarter’s page to get involved.

 

THE Habit of Highly Effective Coders

A good coder is good because they code.

“I never took a day off in my twenties,” says Bill Gates. “Not one.”

The number 1 way to get better at anything is to practice. It doesn’t matter if you do it wrong. As long as you do it.

Suppose you want to improve your typing speed. Typing fast and not worrying about making mistakes is the best way to improve your average speed over time. (Rather than being careful to spell everything correctly and take your time.)

At first, you’ll make tons of mistakes while typing at faster than your comfortable speed. But over time, you’ll make fewer mistakes. You have to push past your comfort level in order to raise it.

Making mistakes is the #1 way to learn.

Instead of copying and pasting, write code out yourself. Though it may be harder, understanding what you’re doing is how you truly learn. 

The tech field changes constantly. Technology innovates faster and faster day by day. The truth is, to be a developer, you have to keep learning. You can’t just get a degree in computer science and expect to use what you learned and nothing else for the rest of your life.

You have to be willing to continue to expand your skill set.

Lucky for you, that’s good for your brain. Your mind (and resume) will thank you for it.

New coding languages become the rage every year, and they’re all competing for the top spot. Just like you as a developer.

The greats didn’t become great overnight. Everyone was a beginner once. You can have some natural talent, sure, but you can’t expect to become great over that alone. Success takes work.

And don’t worry, there are tons of resources that make it easy for you to keep up with the newest releases and what’s in demand in the field. (Such as Mammoth Interactive’s courses).

 

Implementing a Button | Unity Tutorial

In virtual reality (VR) games, one of the few interactions a player can make is press a button by looking at it. In this tutorial, we will implement the button we made in our previous Unity tutorial.

If you are a beginner and want to learn how to build virtual reality games, check out our Unity3D course!

There are two ways to interact with the button. Both ways involve looking (the looking logic). We need to understand how to identify the button. To do this, we will perform raycasting.

To draw an image, Main Camera throws rays in multiple directions to find pixels to draw. We will use the ray that shoots forward in the direction the camera is facing. If the ray flying from the camera touches an object, we will identify the object.

Rename Main Camera “Player” because the player will look through the lens of the camera. We can treat the camera as the eyes of the player. Create a C# script in Assets. Name the script “Player”. Drag and drop the Player script to “Player” in the Hierarchy.

Double-click on the Player script to open it. Type the following code in the Update method in Player.cs. This code declares the local variable hit of type RaycastHit.

public class Player : MonoBehaviour {
// Use this for initialization
void Start () {

}

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;
}
}

hit is a local variable because we declared it in one function. You can only call a local variable within its function. If you know you are only going to use a variable in one function, declare it as a local variable.

If you declare a variable in a class outside of a function, you can use the variable throughout the functions in the class. These variables are global.

If you hover over “RaycastHit”, you can read that if your raycast hits an object, the object will be stored in hit, along with other details.

Create the following if block, which calls the Raycast method from the Physics class.

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;

if (Physics.Raycast()) {

}
}

We need to pass three parameters to perform the raycast:

1. We need to pass the origin of the raycast. We want the ray to come from the exact position of the camera. transform.position is the position of Player.

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;

if (Physics.Raycast(transform.position)) {

}
}

2. We need to pass the direction of the ray. transform.forward refers to the direction of the blue arrow. transform.forward always points forward even when the camera rotates.

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;

if (Physics.Raycast(transform.position, transform.forward)) {

}
}

3. We need to pass where we will save the hit information if there is a hit. We will store the information in the hit variable.

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;

if (Physics.Raycast(transform.position, transform.forward, out hit)) {

}
}

The if block’s condition will return true when the raycast hits something. In this case, we will use the hit variable. The condition will return false when the raycast does not hit anything. hit will not store a value, so we will not use it.

If the condition returns true, use the following code to print the name of the object the raycast hit.

// Update is called once per frame
void Update () {
Raycast hit;

if (Physics.Raycast(transform.position, transform.forward)) {
Debug.Log (hit.transform.name);
}
}

Save the script, and open Unity. Press Play. Press Alt/Option, and move the cursor until the crosshair is on top of Button. The console will print the message “Button” constantly because every time the Update method is called, it sees that we are looking at the button, and it prints the message.

Save your project. Want to learn more about buttons? Check out our Unity3D course, where you build 30 virtual reality games!