Curriculum of our Android Studio, Java and TensorFlow course

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Introduction to Machine Learning + Software

  • An interview with your instructor
  • Intro to the Course (9:56)
  • Update! Resources Folder

Intro to Android Studio

  • Intro and Topics List (2:25)
  • Downloading and Installing Android Studio (6:44)
  • Exploring Interface (12:12)
  • Setting up an Emulator and Running Project (6:43)

Intro to Java

  • Intro to Language Basics (2:46)
  • Variable Types (14:00)
  • Operations on Variables (10:49)
  • Array and Lists (9:26)
  • Array and List Operations (7:59)
  • If and Switch Statements (11:34)
  • While Loops (10:09)
  • For Loops (8:51)
  • Functions Intro (8:39)
  • Parameters and Return Values (7:05)
  • Classes and Objects Intro (12:13)
  • Superclass and Subclasses (11:42)
  • Static Variables and Axis Modifiers (7:27)

Intro to App Development

  • Intro to Android App Development (1:57)
  • Building Basic User Interface (12:15)
  • Connecting UI to Backend (6:12)
  • Implementing Backend and Tidying UI (9:09)

Intro to Machine Learning Concepts

  • Introduction to ML Concepts
  • Downloading and Installing PyCharm and Python (6:55)
  • Exploring PyCharm (7:48)

Python Language Basics

  • Intro and Topics List (2:40)
  • Intro to Variables (13:17)
  • Variables Operations and Conversions (12:35)
  • Collection Types (12:47)
  • Collections Operations (8:42)
  • Control Flow If Statements (12:50)
  • While and For Loops (10:44)
  • Functions (11:23)
  • Classes and Objects (15:40)
  • Source Code

Intro to TensorFlow

  • TensorFlow Intro (2:53)
  • Topics List (6:09)
  • Importing TensorFlow to PyCharm (4:25)
  • Constant Nodes and Sessions (9:01)
  • Variable Nodes (10:45)
  • Placeholder Nodes (7:35)
  • Operation Nodes (12:47)
  • Loss, Optimizers, and Training (11:56)
  • Building a Linear Regression Model (20:30)
  • Source Code

Machine Learning in Android Studio Projects

  • Introduction to Level 2 (5:15)

Introduction to Tensorflow Estimator

  • Introduction (3:08)
  • Topics List (4:12)
  • Setting up Prebuilt Estimator Model (15:15)
  • Evaluating and Predicting with Prebuilt Model (7:42)
  • Building Custom Estimator Function (10:12)
  • Testing Custom Estimator Function (7:00)
  • Summary and Model Comparison (9:46)
  • Source Code

Intro to Android ML Model Import

  • Intro and Demo (4:09)
  • Topics List (4:22)
  • Formatting and Saving Model (8:25)
  • Saving Optimized Graph File (14:48)
  • Starting Android Project (9:01)
  • Building UI (14:56)
  • Implementing Inference Functionality (9:14)
  • Testing and Error Fixing (11:01)
  • Source Files

Simple MNIST

  • Intro and Demo (3:50)
  • Topics List and Intro to MNIST Data (10:24)
  • Building Computational Graph (14:20)
  • Training and Testing Model (14:24)
  • Saving and Freezing Graph for Android Import (12:33)
  • Setting up Android Studio Project (13:07)
  • Building User Interface (15:58)
  • Loading Digit Images (10:02)
  • Formatting Image Data (10:59)
  • Making Prediction Using Model (7:32)
  • Displaying Results and Summary (13:13)
  • Source Files

MNIST With Estimator

  • Introduction (3:08)
  • Topics List (2:38)
  • Building Custom Estimator Function (15:34)
  • Building Input Functions, Training, and Testing (13:38)
  • Predicting Using Model and Model Comparisons (9:37)
  • Source Files

Build Image Recognition Apps

  • Introduction to Building Image Recognition Apps (6:34)

Weather Prediction

  • Intro and Demo (3:49)
  • Tasks List (4:36)
  • Retrieving the Data (14:00)
  • Formatting Data Sets (14:02)
  • Building Computational Graph (11:47)
  • Writing, Training, Testing, and Evaluating Functions (12:24)
  • Training, Testing, and Freezing the Model (9:48)
  • Setting up Android Project (8:05)
  • Building the UI (15:29)
  • Build App Backend and Project Summary (13:46)
  • Source Code

Text Prediction

  • Intro and Demo (4:13)
  • Tasks List (3:17)
  • Processing Text Data (13:18)
  • Building Data Sets and Model Builder Function (16:16)
  • Building Computational Graph (8:37)
  • Writing, Training, and Testing Code (15:11)
  • Training, Testing, and Freezing Graph (12:27)
  • Setting up Android Project (7:41)
  • Setting up UI (5:19)
  • Setting up Vocab Dictionary (8:34)
  • Formatting Input and Running Through Model (7:55)
  • Source Code

Stock Market Prediction

  • Intro and Demo (3:47)
  • Task List (5:17)
  • Retrieving Data via RESTful API Call (16:30)
  • Parsing JSON Data Pycharm Style (6:37)
  • Formatting Data (15:45)
  • Building the Model (13:26)
  • Training and Testing the Model (9:54)
  • Freezing Graph (10:06)
  • Setting up Android Project (6:07)
  • Building UI (8:25)
  • Requesting Data Via AsyncTask (8:25)
  • Parsing JSON Data Android Style (12:04)
  • Running Inference and Displaying Results (17:42)
  • Source Code

Image Analysis with Keras

  • Introduction to Level 4 (9:44)

Simple CIFAR-10

  • Intro and Demo (4:47)
  • Topics List (3:47)
  • Exploring CIFAR-10 Dataset (10:48)
  • Update! CIFAR_10 Android Fix
  • Formatting Input Data (13:13)
  • Building the Model (16:24)
  • Freezing Graph and Training Model (16:56)
  • Setting up the Android Project (16:43)
  • Setting up UI (9:02)
  • Loading and Displaying Image (6:33)
  • Formatting Image Data for Model Input (13:55)
  • Predicting and Displaying Results (13:26)
  • Summary and Outro (6:39)
  • Source Code

Face Detection

  • Intro and Demo (3:20)
  • Tasks List (3:09)
  • Loading Face and Non Face Images (15:56)
  • Reformatting Input Data (11:12)
  • Build Model + Write, Train & Test Scripts (19:12)
  • Freeze Graph + Train & Test Model (14:38)
  • Setting up Android Project (11:49)
  • Setting up UI (7:52)
  • Loading and Display Images (10:11)
  • Formatting Data and Running Inference (12:47)
  • Displaying Results and Summary (8:51)
  • Source Code

Emotions Detection

  • Intro and Demo (3:39)
  • Tasks List (2:34)
  • Loading and Formatting Data (11:13)
  • Build Training and Testing Datasets (6:52)
  • Building the Model (9:57)
  • Build Functions to Train, Test, & Predict (11:58)
  • Training and Testing the Model (11:06)
  • Setting up Android Project (6:33)
  • Importing and Displaying Images (6:25)
  • Convert Images and Run Inference (8:17)
  • Displaying Results and Summary (7:48)
  • Source Code

Increase Efficiency of Machine Learning Models

  • Intro to Increasing ML Efficiency (5:47)
  • Source Code

Introduction to Tensorflow Lite

  • Tensorflow Lite (10:19)

Text Summarizer

  • Introduction (6:22)
  • How a Model Is Built (13:08)
  • Training and Summarizing Mechanisms (9:31)
  • Training and Summarizing Code (7:44)
  • Testing the Model (5:27)
  • Source Code

Object Localization

  • Introduction (4:13)
  • Examining Project Code (15:05)
  • Testing with a Mobile Device (7:30)

Object Recognition

  • Introduction (7:30)
  • Examining Code (22:29)
  • Testing on Mobile Device (5:36)

Intro to Tensorboard

  • Introduction (2:55)
  • Examining Computational Graph In Tensorboard (13:46)
  • Analyzing Scalars and Histograms (13:01)
  • Modifying Model Parameters Across Multiple Runs (10:32)
  • Source Code

Advanced ML Concepts

  • Introduction (18:49)
  • Source Code

Advanced MNIST

  • Intro and Demo (3:42)
  • Topics List (3:41)
  • Building Neuron Functions (11:18)
  • Building the Convolutional Layers (11:51)
  • Building Dense, Dropout, and Readout Layers (14:38)
  • Loss & Optimizer Functions, Training, & Testing (19:51)
  • Optimizing Saved Graph (10:57)
  • Setting up Android Project (12:30)
  • Setting Up UI (10:58)
  • Load and Display Digit Images (6:14)
  • Formatting Model Input (13:52)
  • Displaying Results and Summary (11:11)
  • Source Files

Advanced CIFAR-100

  • Intro and Demo (3:18)
  • Tasks List (3:11)
  • Inputting and Formatting Data (10:50)
  • Building the Model (10:19)
  • Training, Testing, and Freezing Model (10:57)
  • Setting up Android Project (10:24)
  • Building UI (8:09)
  • Loading and Displaying Images (7:03)
  • Converting Image Data & Running Inference (7:37)
  • Summary and Outro (9:29)
  • Source Code

Image Recognition in iOS

  • Introduction and Demo (3:20)
  • Project Setup (6:59)
  • Displaying and Resizing Images (9:42)
  • Converting Image to Pixel Buffer (14:06)
  • Summary and Outro (8:07)
  • Source Code

Intro to iOS

  • Introduction (2:15)
  • Source Code

Xcode Intro

  • Downloading and Installing (6:22)
  • Exploring XCode’s Interface (15:40)

Swift Language Basics

  • Variables Intro (7:57)
  • Variable Operations (10:43)
  • Collections (8:57)
  • Control Flow (10:18)
  • Functions (5:28)
  • Classes and Objects (9:55)

iOS App Development Intro

  • Building App From Start to Finish (12:46)

Intro to CoreML

  • Introduction to CoreML (9:08)

iOS Tensorflow Model Import

  • Introduction (4:35)
  • Converting pb to mlmodel
  • File & Setting up Project (7:34)
  • Running Inference Through Model (9:58)
  • Testing and Summary (3:55)

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5. Classes, objects, and other structures available in Kotlin.

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Throughout the course, we will compare Kotlin and Java. Java is a popular programming language that many developers use to create content for the Web. Kotlin is a lot more syntactically flexible than Java. This allows you to have more fine control over how you write code to accomplish the tasks you want. You can insert an aspect of personality into code and write it how you want it to be read. It’s easy to incorporate Kotlin into existing projects and applications.

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Introduction to Java Class Constructors: Android Studio Crash Course (Free Tutorial)

Picture this: you have a user that wants to specify the details of a product. Today we’re going to be looking at a user who inputs the make, model, and manufacturing year of their car, and we want Java to display the inputs as a message.

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When an object is created, Java first executes the code in the constructor. The constructor will then invoke that object. In this example, we’ll look at both default and customized constructors in a Java class. So let’s create a class! To follow along in Android Studio, go into Project view. Then go to app > java. Right-click on the topmost com.example.zebra.demo. Select New > Java Class.

The tab “Create New Class” will pop up. Let’s name our class “Car”. You should see the following on your screen:

public class Car {

}

As you can see, we have created our new class. It will also appear in Project view inside the same folder that contains the MainActivity class.

Before we create constructors, we have to instantiate a couple of fields. In the public class Car, let’s declare some fields. Note that, unlike in this example, these fields are usually private, meaning that they can only be accessed in this class. In your public class, create two public strings named make and model. Also create a public integer variable for the year in which the car was manufactured. Name it yearManufactured. Note that each of these lines must end in a semi-colon.

public class Car {
public String make;
public String model;
public int yearManufactured;
}

Now that we have created some properties for the car object, we have to create a constructor. First let’s trying using a default constructor. Note that a constructor takes the same name as its class. Still within the public class, type the following:

//default constructor
public Car (){

}

Instantiate the fields by adding onto the constructor so it looks like this:

//default constructor
public Car (){
this.make = "";
this.model = "";
this.yearManufactured = 2000;
}

For string variables, we usually put "", signifying empty strings. For integer variables, we usually use 0. In this example, we used 2000 because it’s a much more appropriate default value for the year in which a car was manufactured.

Next go to app > java > (topmost) com.example.zebra.demo > MainActivity. Beneath setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);, create a new object called myCar. Use the default constructor Car:

Car myCar = new Car();

We also want to display a message on the screen. To set the message, on the next line, create the string message, and set it equal to the properties that we created in the Car class.

String message = "Make: " + myCar.make +
"\nModel: " + myCar.model +
"\nYear manufactured: " + myCar.yearManufactured;

Note that because we added \n to the last two lines, our message will be displayed on three separate lines.

To display our message, we can use the Toast utility in Android Studio. On the next line, type in “Toast”, select “Create a new Toast”, and hit Enter. Android Studio will auto-complete the following code:

Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this, "", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

To specify the message we want to display, edit that code so it looks like this:

Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this, "Brand of my car: " + myVehicle.getBrand() + " Conversion rate between KM and MILES: " + Vehicle.KILOMETERS_TO_MILES, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

Run the emulator, and zoom in. Because we used the default constructor, you will see that the defaults we created will be shown on the screen:

Make:
Model:
Year manufactured: 2000

There are no values for the make or model of the car since we didn’t specify their values when we created the Car class. So let’s specify their values, shall we? To do so, we must create a customized constructor back in the Car.java tab.

Below the default constructor, add a customized one:

//customized constructor
public Car(){

}

The only difference between the default constructor and the customized constructor is that we can pass some parameters in the parentheses of the customized constructor. Let’s add these parameters into the parentheses: String make, String model, int yearManufactured.

These are the parameters that the users of our application will input. For instance, a user will specify the make of a car, such as Honda, then the model, such as Civic, and the year manufactured, such as 2013. Since these are specific values, we have to make sure that our fields store these values. In the customized constructor, type the following lines:

this.make = make;
this.model = model;
this.yearManufactured = yearManufactured;

This code means that your field that stores, for example, the make is equal to the make that the user inputs in the initialization of the object that we just specified in the parentheses.

Let’s see how this customized constructor works. Instead of having the Car instantiate the constructor without any parameters, we’ll specify for the make, model, and manufacturing year of a car. In the parentheses after Car myCar = new Car, type: "Honda", "Civic", 2013.

If you run the emulator, you will see the following:

Make: Honda
Model: Civic
Year manufactured: 2013

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